TED DANSON FIXES FRIDGES IS GO

HOLLYWOOD – New show Ted Danson Fixes Fridges has got its star: Ted Danson.

Ted Danson is more famous for pouring drinks in Cheers or appearing in the Good Place. But in his new shows he’s going to have a very specific task: fixing your fridge. Every episode an ordinary member of the public is going to have a problem with a fridge. They’ll call a special hotline and Ted Danson will come over to the house, diagnose the problem and fix the fridge.

The guy who turned up in Saving Private Ryan and made you say ‘Fuck is that Ted Danson from Cheers’ spoke EXCLUSIVELY to the Studio Exec:

The concept is crazy. But very relate-able. We all own fridges and sometimes, life being imperfect, those fridges don’t work.

Have you had any training fixing fridges?

No, none whatsoever.

So how are you going to do it?

Therein lies the entertainment. I mean I’m going to give it my best shot, but it will mostly be guess work. I don’t know. How difficult can it be to fix a fridge?

Pretty difficult. Otherwise we wouldn’t need to call anyone.

You have a point there.

Ted Danson Fixes Fridges is on HULU.

TED DANSON FIXES FRIDGES GETS STAR

HOLLYWOOD – New show Ted Danson Fixes Fridges has got its star: Ted Danson.

Ted Danson is more famous for pouring drinks in Cheers or appearing in the Good Place. But in his new shows he’s going to have a very specific task: fixing your fridge. Every episode an ordinary member of the public is going to have a problem with a fridge. They’ll call a special hotline and Ted Danson will come over to the house, diagnose the problem and fix the fridge.

The guy who turned up in Saving Private Ryan and made you say ‘Fuck is that Ted Danson from Cheers’ spoke EXCLUSIVELY to the Studio Exec:

The concept is crazy. But very relate-able. We all own fridges and sometimes, life being imperfect, those fridges don’t work.

Have you had any training fixing fridges?

No, none whatsoever.

So how are you going to do it?

Therein lies the entertainment. I mean I’m going to give it my best shot, but it will mostly be guess work. I don’t know. How difficult can it be to fix a fridge?

Pretty difficult. Otherwise we wouldn’t need to call anyone.

You have a point there.

Ted Danson Fixes Fridges is on HULU.

FURY: REVIEW

FURY: REVIEW – Brad Pitt and his team of Inglourious Basterds are at it again in the Das Boot sequel, this time set in a tank!

The good war gets a bit of the Vietnam treatment, with blood and guts aplenty in this thrilling but predictable war movie.  It all starts nice and murky with a foggy and infernal battlefield and a man on a white horse (not Death, though that’ll come) trotting through the wreckage and the carcasses. Sgt. Wardaddy (Pitt) and his crew are the lone survivors of a battle. One of their number met his gruesome end and his replacement, an inevitably pasty faced youth called Norman (Logan Lerman), with ‘principles’, turns up to be roundly disabused of such notions of honour. He is the same charcters as we have seen in other war movies. Basically the cypher for the audience as he is taught the rigors of combat. He is Carter in ER, getting used to the sight of blood.

And there is plenty of bloody and gore in Fury, which seems to be consciously trying to surpass the viscera-fests Saving Private Ryan, Band of Brothers et al. However, those films, despite their gore and violence, insisted on the Second World War as the Good War. Fury harks back to The Big Red One, despairing of the idea of finding honor in any kind of warfare, but unlike Samuel Fuller’s nihilistic 1980 classic, Fury is compromised by a gee-whiz element, informed by Medal of Honor video game action.

As such the nihilism is not so much despairing as exhilarating. Whereas in previous films, Pitt’s behavior would have made him the charismatic bad sergeant like Tom Berenger in Oliver Stone’s Platoon, in this film his world view is repeatedly endorsed. As the story becomes increasingly predictable all we are left with is the action and the thrill of the last ditch heroics.

Despite the shocks, the biggest upset is seeing Shia La Beouf  being actually quite good.

For more Reviews CLICK HERE.

AN APPEAL FROM STEVEN SPIELBERG

HOLLYWOOD – Hi, my name is Steven Spielberg, director of such great films as Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Jaws, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Lincoln, War Horse, Sugarland Express, Schindler’s List, Jurassic Park, Catch Me If You Can, Saving Private Ryan, Amistad, Hook, 1941, The Color Purple, Empire of the Sun, Munich and Always.

You might also know me from my executive producer credits on ER, Falling Skies, the Transformers series and many other TV Shows and films. Oh, I also kind of directed Poltergeist, but shhhhh. 

But today I don’t want to talk to you as the director of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Tin Tin the Secret of the Unicorn and certainly not as the director of The Terminal … to tell you the truth I always try and forget that one. 

No. I’m here to talk to you as a normal human being. A simple man. Cast from your mind Jurassic Park: The Lost World and Duel. Not to mention the beguiling science fiction fairy tales A.I. and E.T. And let’s not get into my cameo role in The Blues Brothers, or those documentaries I made about the Second World War and President Obama. And what’s the point in dredging up the segment of The Twilight Zone movie and those episodes of Columbo I was involved with? I was a young man, a kid and no one knew me. It just isn’t relevant to the point I want to make and this very important issue which I would like to shine a light on today.

So PLEASE sign the petition and remember to give generously. Thank You.


Steven Spielberg

SCHINDLER’S LIST, A ‘TRUE STORY’ CLAIMS EXPERT

Famous and accomplished film director, Steven Spielberg has come under attack from Princeton University history professor Dr. Marcus Grumble who claims in his new book Copycat: How Spielberg Robbed History that the 1941 filmmaker stole the story lines of many of his most famous films from reality.
Dr. Grumble even goes so far as to claim that Oscar winning masterpiece Schindler’s List is nothing more than a copy of stuff that actually happened, but with actors pretending to be people who they are really not.
Speaking in the pipe smoke filled office in the leafy confines of frosty academia, Grumble said:

He is a very good film director and I though – when I began my book – a wholly original one. Space aliens and archaeologists whipping people, and what have you. It was to my horror that I discovered that the story behind Schindler’s List was almost entirely taken from reality and Oscar Schindler did in fact exist and save Jews etc. Spielberg even has the audacity to put the real people at the end of his film walking beside the actors. Talk about hiding in plain sight. 

Continuing his investigation, Grumble noticed also that the D-Day landings were an actual event and not a Hollywood set piece devised by Spielberg to show off his new shaky camera. Likewise, he can confirm that Lincoln is not a fictional character and did indeed emancipate the slaves.

The more I dug the more I found out what a fraud and copier Spielberg was. He makes up very little. Amistad? True event. Catch Me If You Can? True story. Munich? Actually happened. Jurassic Park? True. It’s almost as if he’s taking real life stuff, and somehow reproducing it in a dramatic form with people who pretend to be real people who really lived. Spielberg, or Steal-berg as I call him, is no more than a plagiarist of history.

Steven Spielberg refused to be interviewed thus proving everything Dr. Grumble said to be entirely true.