TERRY GILLIAM ACCIDENTALLY DELETES THE MAN WHO KILLED DON QUIXOTE

LONDON – Terry Gilliam today admitted that he had accidentally deleted his new film The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.

Terry Gilliam took 17 years to complete his new film The Man Who Killed Don Quixote. Having only yesterday announced to excited fans that he had finished the film, he returned to Facebook today with a heartbreaking message, entitled ‘I should have made a backup copy’:

So I had the film wrapped, everything shot, and as with all movies these days it was all digital. I had it on a portable hard drive but when I unplugged it from the computer I forgot to click on that ‘safely remove hardware thing’ and apparently it formatted the whole disc. Erasing the movie. I know what you’re thinking. Why didn’t you make a backup? and I can only say, I don’t know. But don’t worry fans, I’ll be making it again next year and every year for the rest of my life.

The film had gone through a number of versions with different casts, including a version with Robert Duvall and Ewan MacGregor and one with Jean Rochefort and Johnny Depp. The most recent iteration starred Jonathan Pryce and Adam Driver.

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote will begin filming again in 2018.

SAM LOWRY KILLED IN CHURCH EXPLOSION

LONDON – Former bureaucrat and long-term political prisoner Sam Lowry has been killed in a church explosion.

News came in earlier this week that Sam Lowry has been killed when the church he was in blew up. Lowry first came to prominence in the 1980s when his short career in Information Retrieval was cut short following an ill-advised dalliance with a terrorist.  He subsequently spent three years in prison and on his release fell out of the public eye, living an itinerant life. Rumor also tells of several stays in mental health facilities. Over the last few years Lowry joined a religious cult and changed his name to the High Sparrow. His group gained a foothold in the city of King’s Landing which is just south of Bristol in the United Kingdom. A friend spoke EXCLUSIVELY with the Studio Exec:

What makes this so tragic is that Sam was putting his life together and I’ve never known him to be so happy. He had a group of helpers around him, with some quite gruesome tattoos. But he was doing what he wanted to do. He kept telling me that I had the blessings of the seven. I don’t know what he meant but it seemed to bring him peace.

Lowry and many of his followers had congregated in the church when suddenly and inexplicably a massive green fireball erupted from its very foundations, causing damage to nearby buildings and injuring several passers by.

The police are not treating the incident as suspicious.

47 FILMS: 26. BRAZIL

HOLLYWOOD – In the latest in our series of 47 Films You Have to See Before You Are Murdered in Your Dreams, we look at Terry Gilliam’s suitably nutty Brazil.

Sam Lowry (Jonathan Pryce) is an unambitious man working his humdrum job in records, dealing with a fully automated home where everything malfunctions and living happily enough in a society plagued terrorist attacks and an authoritarian regime that suppresses all freedom.  Like Hamlet, he would be happy ‘were it not that I have bad dreams’.  Okay. Sam’s dreams are a Mitty like escape from the fearful drudgery that surrounds him. He is a winged knight forever rescuing the fair maiden, but it is this which will get him in so much trouble when he meets his fantasy in the form of real life trucker Jill (Kim Greist). This leads him to accept the promotion his mother (Katherine Helmond) has finagled to Information Retrieval.

Brazil presents perhaps the most successful cinematic version of George Orwell’s 1984 – there are several direct references in the film. However, Gilliam’s dystopia is not only oppressive by design but arbitrarily incompetent. The whole course of events starts with a typo, the ghost in the machine is a squashed fly. The ludicrous – rogue plumbers who actually fix things on time are considered terrorists, socialites compete on who can have the most radical plastic surgery – mix with the horrifying. There’s something dreadful in Sam’s fate as he is essentially a little boy, cosseted by his mother and who has never questioned the world in which he lives, as he races whooping towards a confrontation with forces he doesn’t understand. Pryce is perfect in the role. And the cameos are all pitch perfect grotesques. Gilliam’s fellow Python, Michael Palin is excellent as Sam’s cheery peer, a friendly torturer who is as much fascinated by office politics as he is committed to his own gruesome efficiency; Bob Hoskins as Spoor, the government plumber and Robert de Niro as Tuttle, the rogue plumber.

Gilliam’s visual sense creates a detailed and visually striking world, the creaking 1940s technology of tubes and ducts. Tom Stopard co-screenwriter is on hand to give the same detail to the language of euphemism and coercion that dominates the film. Or the deputy minister Helpman (Peter Vaughn) with his endless supply of sporting metaphors. Read the posters in the background – ‘Don’t Suspect a Friend, Report Him!’

Brazil was Gilliam’s masterpiece and the troubles he had making the film and getting it distributed set him on a trajectory of awkwardness for years to come, but frankly it was worth it.

For more of our 47 Films Click Here.