TRUE DETECTIVE SEASON 3 TO HAVE TITLE CHANGE

HOLLYWOOD – Nic Pizzolatto revealed today that True Detective Season 3 will have a title change and some significant differences to the first two seasons.

“A rose by any other name would smell just as sweet” wrote Julian Fellowes or someone, but HBO seem to disagree and are hoping that the title change of True Detective 3 will create a much needed in critical and audience reaction. The second season indeed was so poorly received that its still quite high ratings were explained as being due to ‘hate watching’.

Nic Pizzolatto, close friend of the Studio Exec, popped in to the Studio Exec bungalow to explain his thinking:

I think I’ve got bogged down in certain genre aspects of what I was trying to do. The first show had this Lovecraft type thing going on. The second I was Los Angeles bound and I was very influenced by James Ellroy. But with the next season I’m going to take George Romero as my primary influencer.

That sounds like a real change.

Oh it is. And it will be reflected in the action of the story. I can’t tell you too much as we’re in the process of casting and still developing the scripts, but my thoughts are clear that what people want is something much more direct, less dense, packed with action as well perhaps.

But George Romero is more famed as a horror director. 

And we will be going more in that direction and why not? We had element of that in the first season and I’d like to bring it back. I feel it was something that a lot of people missed from the second. Don’t get me wrong. I’m extremely proud of what we were able to accomplish in the second show. We managed to Taylor Kitsch, Vince Vaughn and Colin Farrell and no one laughed. Not once. At least not intentionally.

Fear the True Detective will be broadcast June 2016.

TRUE DETECTIVE 2: ‘MAYBE TOMORROW’ REVIEW

TRUE DETECTIVE SEASON 2: EPISODE 3 REVIEW – The ‘plot’ deepens, I think, as someone does something somewhere. Meanwhile somewhere else some other people doing other things.

F*cking sh*t! Colin Farrell is not dead. The survival of Colin Farrell felt like a kick in the chest. So we’re not going with the bold move. He didn’t even wake up in hospital. Though it was funny that he pissed himself. The danger element that would have added greatly to the show if Velcro had been offed is now removed and then some. Now we know the creepy murderer isn’t going to hurt people who need to be around for contractual reasons.

In other news, Nic Pizzolatto continues to own dick dialogue with the impeccable ‘suck your own dick’ delivered to Vince Vaughn in something that looked like a dark out take from his hit comedy Delivery Man. Vince’s Frank is still looking hassled and petulant by turns. But at least he gets to punch someone and gets the best line of the show so far: ‘Don’t take off your rings, it won’t be a problem for me.’

Velcro and Rachel McAdams stalk around a studio back lot where something like Mad Max is being made. The on set photographer sneers that they’re making a load of shit. To which I wanted to scream, Mad Max: Fury Road was a million times better than this bull crap. This show just isn’t good enough to sneer at anything else. The desultory plotting continued as people wandered around a bit more. Taylor Kitsch’s repressed gay is right out of one of James Ellroy’s LA Quartet, but those were set in the fifties, when it made sense. This sense of anachronism plagues the whole show. Despite a hoarding of American Sniper in the background, this feels like a show that should have been set in the eighties. When Kitsch goes into a nightclub and looks traumatized at the depravity he finds – girls and boys dance unchaperoned – we’re supposed to feel in touch with an underbelly, as if internet porn doesn’t exist. There is no underbelly. It’s all belly now.

The final foot chase was a bit of much needed dynamism and looked good, but like the rest of the episode led nowhere. All we know of the prime suspect is he can’t kill people even when he shoots them twice in the chest with a shotgun, and he failed ninja camouflage school, with his high visibility mask.

TRUE DETECTIVE 2: ‘WESTERN BOOK OF THE DEAD’ REVIEW

TRUE DETECTIVE 2: EPISODE 1 REVIEW – John Carter from Mars and a Mean Girl look moody with Alexander the Great and  Jennifer Aniston’s boyfriend.

I used to be a big fan of James Ellory. I loved the LA Quartet and American Tabloid. But The Cold Three Thousand. Spoiled it for me. There’s a point when you hard boil something that everything evaporates and all of a sudden all you have is the smell of burning. In that book there was nary a sentence longer than four words. Everything was clipped and succinct to the point it suc.t.

The Western Book of the Dead – the first episode of the second season of Nic Pizzolatto’s HBO anthology series True Detective is geographically and tonally in prime James Ellroy territory, a dark noir set in the underworld of Los Angeles and environs. It features a set of characters, none of whom ever go to supermarkets or laugh at reruns of The Simpsons (the first five seasons). None of them have even heard of Game of Thrones. Colin Farrell plays Ray, a corrupt cop who drinks, does drugs and who has a fat dopey ginger haired son who is probably the son of his wife’s rapist. Rachel McAdam is Ani, a police officer whose day’s work seems to be going around the county arresting her own backstory – sister’s a prostitute, dad’s a mystic. Taylor Kitsch is officer Woodrugh, a traffic cop and war veteran who is so troubled that he can’t even have a blow job without a haunted facial expression. And Vince Vaughn is the local mobster with the Corleone urge to get into some legitimate business and leave it to his yet to be conceived heir.

I’m not sure if this anxiety over paternity that goes through the first episode is directly related to the shadow cast by the success of True Detective Season 1, and I do have to remember that I couldn’t stand the first show for at least the first three episodes. However, the incessant soundtrack, clipped dialogue and the constant moodiness feel like they’re covering up something superficial and wrong: ‘I wanted to be an astronaut,’ Ray complains into a voice recorder. ‘But astronauts don’t even go to the moon anymore.’ Well, boo-f*cking-hoo.

The body turns up at the end, giving the impression that this was all prologue and there’s hope this might find its groove, as the characters finally swoop on the story, but the familiarity and Justin Linn’s full immersion in True Detective style is not a good omen. And some of the writing is awful. Police detectives approach the mansion of a local big wig who has gone missing: ‘This is a big house for one man’, which is political commentary + exposition – anything anyone would actually say. The guy lives in Los Angeles and he hasn’t noticed that rich politicians live in big houses? Maybe I’m being harsh but Ray did say ‘I welcome judgement’.

Oh and finally…

[SPOILER PREDICTION: If it turns out that Vince Vaughn set up Colin Farrell’s wife’s rape as a way of compromising a cop and putting him in his debt, and then Colin Farrell finds out in episode 7, I will be very displeased.]