INSIDE OUT 2: THE BIPOLAR YEARS GREEN LIT

HOLLYWOOD – Inside Out 2: The Bipolar Years will take the Pixar movie into early adulthood.

The first Inside Out was widely touted as a return to form for Pixar Disney, but the sequel will look to explore darker issues in Inside Out 2: The Bipolar Years.  The official synopsis reads:

Riley is in her mid-twenties and trying to make her way in the world as an intern. She has a boyfriend who she feels is cheating on her and has self-esteem issues which lead to a variety of self-destructive behaviors that are only momentarily calmed by the onset of crushingly dangerous depths of depression.

Peter Docter spoke to us EXCLUSIVELY about the new film.

The first film was very much Joy’s movie, voiced by the marvelous Amy Poehler, as she did her best to come to terms with the nuanced complexities of a child’s inner world. This time round the emotions are much more confused with Joy, Fear (Bill Hader), Anger (Lewis Black)  and Sadness (Phyllis Smith)  being joined by Self-Loathing, Creeping Anxiety and Existential Dread. As we witnessed Riley go from child to girl so we watch young woman turn into wreck.

Wow. That’s not as life-affirming as the original, is it?

Yes and no. But mostly no. We knew that Riley felt like a real person to us and audiences, and we wanted to see her grow up. We watched all the Bridget Jones movies and that was the fountain we kept coming back to for more. Oh and she ends up going to the North Pole and Antarctica, so we address that too.

Inside Out 2: the Bipolar Years will be released in 2018.

INSIDE OUT: REVIEW

INSIDE OUT – REVIEW: New Pixar movie takes us into the inner space for a sophisticated and smart comedy, Inside Out.

‘What is going on that little head of yours?’ parents often ask of their weird little biology projects otherwise known as children. And who’s to say? Well, apparently Pixar. Having given us the secret life of toys in Toy Story; the secret life of monsters in Monsters Inc. and the secret life of Cars… well never mind, now it’s the turn of little sprogs in what is essentially a remake of Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex (But Were Too Afraid to Ask).

We begin with the birth of Riley and almost immediately her head is populated by Joy (Amy Poehler), soon joined by Sadness (Phyllis Smith), and then Anger (Lewis Black), Fear (Bill Hader) and Disgust (Mindy Kaling). With these emotions bustling to get their hands on the controls of the mission control of Riley’s head, Joy is at first the proactive dictator, but as Riley grows and she and her parents move house, Riley and her emotions need to deal with a whole new environment and series of challenges. Directors Pete Docter and Ronaldo Del Carmen have given Pixar the makings of a hit to repair some of the damage done by a generally uninspiring run of sequels and the so-so Brave. There are some great laugh out loud moments, along with some genuine pathos – and though I have some problem with the inside of our heads basically looking like something Apple and Disney cooked up – in the end this is quality children’s entertainment that won’t go over their heads.

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