RESERVOIR DOGS DIRECTOR’S CUT TO INCLUDE DELETED BANK ROBBERY

HOLLYWOOD – Quentin Tarantino will release a director’s cut of his debut hit Reservoir Dogs which will include the much discussed but never seen bank robbery.

Reservoir Dogs has to go down as one of the best debut movies ever. Quentin Tarantino was 29 years old when he unleashed the blood-splattered crime thriller on audiences. And in the process inspiring a host of copycats. In the film a bunch of professional criminals first plot and then deal with the aftermath of a heist. Although we hear all about what happened, we never actually witness the mayhem.

However, in a new theatrical release we are finally going to see what went down as Tarantino puts back in one of the most famous deleted scenes ever. He told the Studio Exec:

We were making the film for very little and so the scene that was most important, the robbery, was, I think, a little clunky. There were basically technical problems to do with lighting, grading etc. that made it unuseable. However, now with technology we can actually fix that and put it back in.

Wow.

When we showed the film at Sundance, everyone thought I was being clever, not showing the robbery. I let them think that because I didn’t want to disappoint. Now enough time has passed and finally, you’ll be able to see the film I wanted to make.

Can you give us a taste?

Yeah. There are things that are really funny that in the original film didn’t make sense. For instance, you know how Harvey Keitel is talking to Tim Roth about the manager being Charles Bronson. Well, when they get in the bank Charles Bronson is actually the manager and they do this double-take!

Hilarious. How the hell did you get Charles Bronson?

He was a good friend of Harvey’s so he agreed to do it for free. Then Michael Madsen mentions Lee Marvin…

I bet you’re a real Lee Marvin fan!

Yeah, exactly. So Lee Marvin is there as a customer. Not actually Lee Marvin, because he died a few years earlier but a lookalike.

So it was a lot more comic. 

Yes. And you how Mr. Blue gets wasted. It was pretty strong. He gets his face entirely shot off. And he’s running around without his face. It’s shocking, but it’s also really funny.

Are there any other deleted scenes?

There is a whole section where Mr. Orange just paints his toenails. Of course in the original cut if you look carefully you can feel that Tim has his toenails painted but you don’t see when he did it. Oh and there’s another five minutes at the end. An alternate ending. We find out what really happens. I call it my Lindelof ending.

Oh fuck.

Yeah, it was all a dream.

Reservoir Dogs: The Director’s Cut will be released in January.

SIR EDWIN FLUFFER REMEMBERS LAURENCE OLIVIER

HOLLYWOOD – In another EXCLUSIVE extract from Sir Edwin Fluffer’s autobiography “In Like Niven!” comes this startlingly honest account of the great English actor and director Sir Laurence Olivier.

Larry Olivier had moved into a new place high in the Hollywood hills. It was every bit as grand and elegant as the great man himself, but the tree outside his bedroom window was home to a large family of rooks, and the dawn chorus would often wake him from his slumber.

 I’ve never been much of a morning person and darling Larry’s early morning phone calls filled me with dread. Following the success of Henry V and Hamlet he’d found another one of Billy Shakespeare’s screenplays to have a go at; but this time he’d decided to turn it into a musical.
 
Banquo! was to be his all singing, all dancing version of Macbeth, and he’d already started work on the score with Larry Adler. I went round for breakfast to hear the fruits of their labour. Adler took out his harmonica and played me a couple of numbers including There Is Nothing Like A Thane and Kiss Me Hecate, I cancelled my plans to go bowling with Keenan Wynn and said “Where do I sign?” 
 
We were all ready to begin filming, sets were up, costumes were made, Donald O’Connor had been booked, then tragedy.  Larry lost a tooth during a heated game of chequers with Bobby Morley and his singing voice went with it. He wouldn’t let the part go to anyone else and the whole thing was cancelled – Three months of work down the drain, and I was furious with him. 
 
Larry Adler gave me one of his harmonicas to say thank you for all my support but I could never learn to play the bloody thing. In the end, I gave it to Charles Bronson who used it to great effect in Sergio Leone’s One Upon A Time In The West. But that’s another story…

6 FACTS YOU NEVER KNEW ABOUT SPAGHETTI WESTERNS

HOLLYWOOD – With the release of Quentin Tarantino’s new movie “The Hateful Eight” many pig ignorant film-goers are going ‘Spaghetti Westerns? What? How? Why and Where?’

Stop, shut up, sit down and let Studio Exec blow knowledge holes in your poncho of stupid with our six fact shooter. 

The Six Shooter of Fact

1. Although called ‘Spaghetti Westerns’ no one actually eats spaghetti. They eat beans.

2. In order to make his films more commercially attractive to US audiences, Sergio Leone anglicized the Italian names of cast and crew: Leone himself became Bob Robertson, Gian Maria Volantè became John Wells, and Neapolitan unknown Diego Cazzituoi became Clint Eastwood.

3. All the gunshots you hear in the Spaghetti Westerns directed by Sergio Corbucci were created by Ennio Morricone the films’ composer who had the knack of imitating realistic gunfire, with his mouth. ‘I learnt it in the school yard, little did I know…p-choooooo,’ said the maestro.

4. Although Quentin Tarantino claims to be an expert on Spaghetti Westerns, he’s never actually seen one. He’s heard about them from a really cool friend and he thought they sounded ‘cool’. When asked whether he’ll try and watch one now, he said he ‘couldn’t be bothered’.

5. Although many people mistakenly believe that the first Spaghetti Western was Sergio Leone’s Fistful of Dollars in 1964, it was not. The first Spaghetti Western was made in 1961 in Japan by Akira Kurosawa and was called Yojimbo.

6. The trademark whistling heard on the soundtracks of all the Spaghetti Westerns was done by unemployed American actor Charles Bronson who later appeared in Once Upon a Time in the West where ironically he didn’t whistle, but played the harmonica. ‘He was a very good whistler,’ laughed Leone. ‘But a shit!’

For more FACTS on everything from this to that click HERE! 

ONLY GOD FORGIVES: REVIEW


The Driver (Ryan Gosling) has been having ‘One Night in Bangkok’ for a few years, running a boxing club and drug dealing, when his big brother gets himself offed. Cue their mother (Kristin Scott Thomaswho turns up looking like Cameron Diaz’s young Ma and trash-talks Driver into seeking revenge from a local policeman (Vithaya Pansringarm), who with his choppy sword and his impassive face is behaving like Charles Bronson on Xanax.

Nicholas Winding Refn has self-consciously made a Midnight Movie, a thin blade of a film with lashings of Ultra Violence, body horror and a hypnotically threatening soundtrack by Cliff Martinez. The story is slight and no more than an excuse for certain key scenes – the boxing match being an obvious centre piece – and the characters likewise are an exercise in style, with Gosling producing a particularly somnambulant parody of himself. 
Channelling his inner David Lynch, Winding Refn has made a good looking film, but it feels like the work of a nice boy playing at bad; a geek grasping for cool, a European dabbling in the icky-ness of the East.